The more common the drug, the more street names have been created — marijuana alone has over 300 known slang names. From prescription drugs like Adderall and Xanax to illicit substances like heroin and LSD, drug slang names are commonly used when discussing drugs to avoid calling attention to authority. If you know someone who may have a substance use disorder, becoming familiar with this guide of drug slang names may clue you in that they need help.

Common Street Names for Illicit Drugs

Drug slang names have mixed origins depending on the substance — what it looks like, where it comes from, its desired effects and more. Slang terms can even come from another language, like marijuana for example.

Teachers, parents and anyone who spends time with teenagers and young adults should familiarize themselves with current drug slang names, especially if they suspect illicit drug use.

Some of these slang terms may be used interchangeably to describe different substances.

Adderall

Adderall, a combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, is a stimulant prescription drug that treats attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults aged three and older. Since Adderall is a stimulant, people sometimes misuse this prescription to improve mental and physical performance, increase activity and enhance self-esteem. Adderall is a Schedule II controlled substance.

Adderall Street Names

Adderall can be sold illicitly and may be recognized by several slang names:

  • A-Train
  • Abby
  • Addy
  • Amps
  • Christmas Trees
  • Co-Pilots
  • Lid Poppers
  • Smart Pills
  • Smarties
  • Study Buddies
  • Study Skittles
  • Truck Drivers
  • Zing

Ambien

Ambien (zolpidem) is a sedative-hypnotic prescription medication used as a sleep aid, to treat insomnia. Ambien is available in tablet form and should be taken as directed — right before bed, since it can cause excessive drowsiness. Ambien is meant to be a temporary medication, as it can cause the person to develop a tolerance with more than two weeks of consistent use. Due to its sedative properties, people can misuse Ambien to achieve relaxation and euphoria. Ambien is a Schedule IV controlled substance.

Ambien Street Names

Zolpidem may be recognized by the following street names:

  • Zombie Pills
  • A-Minus

Ativan

Ativan (lorazepam) is a prescription benzodiazepine that treats anxiety. Like other benzos, it slows central nervous system activity to allow for relaxation. People who misuse Ativan can take it without a prescription, take more of their prescribed medication than advised or take it in other methods such as crushing and snorting tablets. Benzodiazepines are a Schedule IV controlled substance.

Ativan Street Names

Common slang terms for benzodiazepines include:

  • Benzos
  • Downers

Ayahuasca

Ayahuasca is a tea made from one of several Amazonian plants that contain DMT, a hallucinogen. Ayahuasca combines DMT with an alkaloid that prevents the digestive tract from breaking down the DMT, allowing for enhanced effects. Historically, ayahuasca was used in Amazonian healing rituals, but today it is used to achieve strong visual and auditory hallucinations. DMT is a Schedule I controlled substance, but plants that contain DMT are not controlled.

Ayahuasca Street Names

Ayahuasca is also known as:

  • Hoasca
  • Aya
  • Yagé

Bath Salts

Bath salts are synthetic cathinone stimulant drugs. These central nervous system stimulants are designed to mimic ecstasy, cocaine and methamphetamine, and can produce extremely euphoric, though short-lived, effects. In order to avoid being labeled a controlled substance, synthetic cathinones are often marketed as bath salts, plant food, glass cleaner and more. While these substances are used for their desired effects, bath salts can also cause psychosis, aggression and violence.

Bath Salts Street Names

There are many slang terms for bath salts:

  • Bliss
  • Blue Silk
  • Cloud Nine
  • Drone
  • Energy-1
  • Ivory Wave
  • Lunar Wave
  • Meow Meow
  • Ocean Burst
  • Pure Ivory
  • Purple Wave
  • Red Dove
  • Snow Leopard
  • Stardust
  • Vanilla Sky
  • White Dove
  • White Knight
  • White Lightning

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is an opioid partial agonist-antagonist that treats opioid dependence. It is administered to prevent opioid withdrawal symptoms by producing similar, but less harmful, effects. Because of these effects, buprenorphine has the potential to be misused, and is sometimes considered a heroin substitute. Buprenorphine and all substances containing buprenorphine are Schedule III controlled substances.

Buprenorphine Street Names

There are several street names for buprenorphine:

  • Big Whites
  • Buse
  • Oranges
  • Small Whites
  • Sobos
  • Stops
  • Strips
  • Sub
  • Subs

Cocaine

Cocaine is an illicit stimulant drug, derived from coca leaves. It is a white powder that can be snorted or diluted and injected, producing a rapid euphoric “rush” when consumed. Because cocaine tolerance develops quickly, this drug has a high potential for addiction and abuse, and it is therefore a Schedule II controlled substance.

Cocaine Street Names

The most popular cocaine street names include:

  • Blow
  • Coca
  • Coke
  • Crack
  • Flake
  • Snow
  • Soda Cot

Codeine

Codeine is a prescription medication used  to treat mild to moderate pain. It may also be used as a cough suppressant when combined with other medications. It is usually administered orally as a tablet, capsule or solution. It is available by itself, but it is also commonly found in combination with other medications including Tylenol and promethazine. Because it is an opioid, a potential for abuse and addiction exists with this medication. Feelings of relaxation and euphoria may be experienced with codeine.

Codeine Street Names

Street names of codeine include:

  • Cody
  • Little c
  • Schoolboy
  • T3
  • Purple drank
  • Sizzurp

Crack

Cocaine base is known as crack — cocaine is sold in powder form, and crack cocaine appears as irregularly shaped chunks that are typically smoked to achieve the same euphoric high that cocaine produces. Since it differs in appearance, crack cocaine has a different set of slang terms compared to cocaine, but it is still an illicit, Schedule II controlled substance.

Crack Street Names

Crack street names are a bit different than cocaine, and they include:

  • Apple Jack
  • Bazooka
  • Fish Scales
  • Yahoo
  • Dice
  • Nuggets
  • Scruples
  • Cloud Nine
  • French Fries

Crystal Meth

Crystal meth is a form of illicit methamphetamine that resembles different-sized crystals, glass shards or rocks. This stimulant drug can be smoked or injected to achieve a euphoric high that can last for several hours depending on how it’s consumed. Notably, the high can be followed by a crash that could last for days. All forms of methamphetamine, including its legal form, Desoxyn, are Schedule II controlled substances due to their high potential for abuse despite accepted medical use.

Crystal Meth Street Names

Crystal meth slang terms can be related to its appearance or effects:

  • Crystal
  • Chalk
  • Hot Ice
  • Lemon Drop
  • Popsicle
  • Tupperware
  • Windows
  • Zip

Dilaudid

Dilaudid (hydromorphone) is a prescription opioid that is up to eight times more potent than morphine. It is prescribed for pain relief but, like many other opioids, has a high potential for abuse and addiction. People who misuse Dilaudid may take more than prescribed, take higher doses than prescribed, or steal or doctor-shop to get more in order to experience its relaxation-inducing, sedative effects. Psychological and physical dependence may occur. Dilaudid is a Schedule II controlled substance.

Dilaudid Street Names

Like other opioids, Dilaudid is sold illicitly and can be recognized by the following slang terms:

  • D
  • Dillies
  • Dust
  • Footballs
  • Juice
  • Smack

Ecstasy (Molly/MDMA)

Ecstasy is a psychoactive stimulant illicit drug that is used for its energizing effects and enhanced sensory perception. It is commonly used by young adults and teens to encourage feelings of sexuality, closeness and euphoria, but it comes with many unwanted effects including tremors, cramping, anxiety and blurred vision. Many ecstasy tablets are cut with other substances, including methamphetamine and cocaine, which presents an additional danger to those who take this drug. Ecstasy is a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning it has no medical use and a high potential for addiction.

Ecstasy (Molly/MDMA) Street Names

MDMA tablets can be sold in vibrant colors with different “brand names”, and slang terms include:

  • Adam
  • Beans
  • Clarity
  • Disco Biscuit
  • E
  • Eve
  • Go
  • Hug Drug
  • Lover’s Speed
  • Peace
  • STP
  • X
  • XTC

Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a synthetic prescription opioid medication that is used as a pain-reliever and anesthetic. Its pain-relieving properties are up to 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine. While fentanyl is approved by the FDA for pain relief, it is also trafficked and distributed illegally for and by people who misuse this drug to achieve a euphoric and relaxed high. Fentanyl can be prescribed in many forms, including lozenge, tablet, nasal spray and patches. Illicitly-produced fentanyl, however, is made as counterfeit tablets or a powder, either sold alone or combined with other substances. Fentanyl is a Schedule II controlled substance.

Fentanyl Street Names

Fentanyl has grown in popularity, and it may be recognized by the following names:

  • Apache
  • China Girl
  • China Town
  • Dance Fever
  • Friend
  • Goodfellas
  • Great Bear
  • He-Man
  • Jackpot
  • King Ivory
  • Murder 8
  • Tango & Cash

Heroin

Heroin is a fast-acting illicit opioid that is sold as a white or brown powder. It can also be seen as a black sticky substance that’s known as “black tar”. Heroin can be smoked, injected or snorted to achieve a rush of euphoria,  followed by sleepiness and wakefulness. Other opioids, including prescription opioids, can induce similar effects. Since heroin can be cut with other substances, the risk of overdose is relatively high. Heroin is a Schedule I controlled substance.

Heroin Street Names

Common heroin slang names include:

  • Big H
  • Black Tar
  • Chiva
  • Hell Dust
  • Horse
  • Negra
  • Smack
  • Thunder

Hydrocodone

Hydrocodone is an extended-release opioid that’s prescribed to treat severe pain and is available under several brand names, including Vicodin. It is prescribed to people who need round-the-clock pain relief and who can’t take other medications. Like other opioids, physical dependence can occur with continued use, and its use should be monitored by a physician. People who misuse hydrocodone may use higher or more frequent doses than instructed, or they may purchase it illicitly. Hydrocodone is a Schedule II controlled substance due to its potential for abuse and addiction.

Hydrocodone Street Names

When sold illicitly, hydrocodone street names can include:

  • 357s
  • Bananas
  • Dro
  • Fluff
  • Hydro
  • Tabs
  • Norco
  • Vics
  • Vikes
  • Watsons

Inhalants

Inhalants are invisible substances that can be found in common household products including spray paint, markers, butane, cleaning fluids and more. Once inhaled, these chemicals are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and can create similar effects to alcohol intoxication including slurred speech, dizziness and difficulty coordinating movements. Since these products are legally sold for their intended uses, inhalants are not considered controlled substances.

Inhalants Street Names

Despite their legal status, inhalants can be recognized by a few names when used illicitly, including:

  • Gluey
  • Huff
  • Rush
  • Whippets

Ketamine

Ketamine is an anesthetic substance that also has hallucinogenic properties and is manufactured as a liquid or powder. Because ketamine makes people feel detached from their environment and pain even when medically administered, it’s known as a dissociative anesthetic. When used illicitly, it’s considered a “club drug” and is commonly distributed among teens and young adults at private parties rather than purchased on the street. It is misused for its sedative, dissociative and hallucinogenic effects. Ketamine is a Schedule III controlled substance due to its medical uses for anesthesia and treatment-resistant depression, and because it has a risk of psychological or physical dependence.

Ketamine Street Names

Common street names associated with ketamine include:

  • Cat Tranquilizer
  • Cat Valium
  • Jet K
  • Kit Kat
  • Purple
  • Special K
  • Special La Coke
  • Super Acid
  • Super K
  • Vitamin K

Klonopin

Klonopin (clonazepam) is a benzodiazepine that is prescribed to treat seizures, panic attacks, anxiety and muscle spasms. Because clonazepam slows the central nervous system, it is misused for its sedative properties that may cause relaxation. Benzodiazepine misuse is particularly common among people who use cocaine and heroin to enhance those drugs’ effects. Klonopin is a Schedule IV controlled substance.

Klonopin Street Names

Slang names that are specific to Klonopin include:

  • K
  • K-Pin
  • Pin
  • Super Valium

Kratom

Kratom is a Southeast Asian tropical tree whose leaves are consumed to elicit stimulant effects in low doses and sedative effects in higher doses. The psychoactive ingredients that contribute to these effects are mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Kratom leaves are crushed before being smoked and put into capsules or brewed as a tea to achieve increased talkativeness and physical energy at lower doses. Delusion and confusion have also been reported. Kratom is classified as a Drug of Concern by the DEA since it is not deemed a controlled substance.

Kratom Street Names

In Southeast Asia, kratom is known as:

  • Kakuam
  • Thom
  • Ketum
  • Biak

LSD

LSD is a hallucinogenic substance that is produced in laboratories. It’s a colorless, odorless substance that can be taken orally via blotter paper, liquid, tablets or saturated sugar cubes. People who take LSD may experience extreme hallucinations, including distorted colors, movements, touch and self-perception. As a substance with no accepted medical use or accepted safety for use and a high risk of addiction, LSD is a Schedule I controlled substance.

LSD Street Names

There are a handful of common LSD slang terms, including:

  • Acid
  • Dots
  • Mellow Yellow
  • Window Pane

Marijuana

Marijuana is a psychoactive drug derived from the cannabis sativa plant, but its main psychoactive ingredient is THC (delta- 9-tetrahydrocannabinol). Marijuana’s behavioral and psychological effects can vary, but common effects include happiness, dizziness, relaxation, time distortion, impaired judgment, and increased appetite among others. Short-term physical effects typically include increased heart rate, bloodshot eyes, and a possible increase in blood pressure. Marijuana is usually smoked, but it can also be mixed with foods or made into a tea. Despite marijuana legalization in some U.S. states, it remains a Schedule I controlled substance according to the FDA and DEA.

Marijuana Street Names

Some of the most common street names for marijuana include:

  • Aunt Mary
  • BC Bud
  • Blunts
  • Boom
  • Chronic
  • Dope
  • Gangster
  • Ganja
  • Grass
  • Hash
  • Herb
  • Hydro
  • Indo
  • Joint
  • Kif
  • Mary Jane
  • Mota
  • Pot
  • Reefer
  • Sinsemilla
  • Skunk
  • Smoke
  • Weed
  • Yerba

Mescaline

Mescaline is an illicit hallucinogenic substance that is extracted from the peyote cactus of northern Mexico and the southwestern U.S. Other hallucinogens, like LSD and mushrooms cause similar effects, including altered perception of time and space, hallucinations and illusions. Feelings of euphoria from mescaline are often followed by anxiety. Mescaline and peyote are Schedule 1 controlled substances.

Mescaline Street Names

Common street names for peyote and mescaline include:

  • Buttons
  • Cactus
  • Mesc
  • Peyoto

Methadone

Methadone is a synthetic opiate medication prescribed to treat severe pain in people who need round-the-clock pain management. Methadone can also prevent opiate withdrawal symptoms in people who are undergoing opiate detoxification and receiving treatment for an opiate use disorder. Like other opiates, however, methadone can cause pleasurable effects which could lead to misuse. Since non-medical use of methadone is not approved by the FDA or DEA, it is a Schedule II controlled substance.

Methadone Street Names

Common methadone slang names include:

  • Amidone
  • Chocolate Chip Cookies
  • Fizzies with MDMA
  • Wafer

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine is a stimulant, and it is prescribed with the brand name Desoxyn as part of an ADHD treatment regimen and to treat obesity. While methamphetamine may help control symptoms of ADHD, it does not treat the condition. When produced illegally, methamphetamine is sold as powder, pills or crystalline rocks and the drug can be injected, snorted or smoked. When smoked or injected, a very brief euphoric rush is reported, but a euphoric high could last for several hours when the drug is snorted or ingested orally. People who use meth for longer periods can exhibit aggression, violence, paranoia and delusions, and high doses may result in death. Methamphetamine is a Schedule II controlled substance.

Methamphetamine Street Names

Meth street names can refer to the drug’s appearance or effects, and some of these names include:

  • Batu
  • Bikers Coffee
  • Black Beauties
  • Chalk
  • Chicken Feed
  • Crank
  • Crystal
  • Glass
  • Go-Fast
  • Hiropon
  • Ice
  • Meth
  • Methlies Quick
  • Poor Man’s Cocaine
  • Shabu
  • Shards
  • Speed
  • Stove Top
  • Tina
  • Trash
  • Tweak
  • Uppers
  • Ventana
  • Vidrio
  • Yaba
  • Yellow Bam

Morphine

Morphine is an opioid derived from the opium poppy. It is prescribed under several brand names, including Kadian and Roxanol, for moderate to severe pain relief. Morphine is available as a liquid, extended-release tablet and extended-release capsule, all taken orally. Due to its euphoric effects, morphine can be misused, which comes with the risk of physical and psychological dependence. Heroin, methadone and oxycodone, among other substances, cause similar effects. Morphine is a Schedule II controlled substance.

Morphine Street Names

Common street names for morphine include:

  • Dreamer
  • Emsel
  • First Line
  • God’s Drug
  • Hows
  • M.S.
  • Mister Blue
  • Morf
  • Morpho
  • Unkie

Mushrooms

Certain dried or fresh mushrooms contain psilocybin, a hallucinogenic chemical that causes effects similar to those of peyote and mescaline. Mushrooms used for hallucinogenic purposes tend to have slender, long stems with dark brown, light brown or white caps. These mushrooms can be eaten, added to foods or brewed as tea to achieve hallucinogenic effects, but psychotic episodes and panic are possible when mushrooms are ingested in high doses. Mushrooms and psilocybin are Schedule I controlled substances.

Mushrooms Street Names

Hallucinogenic mushrooms have a few common street names:

  • Magic Mushrooms
  • Mushrooms
  • Shrooms

Oxycodone

Oxycodone is a prescription opioid medication, available under the brand name OxyContin, that treats moderate to severe pain. It is also available in combination with acetaminophen as Roxicet and others, aspirin as Percodan, and ibuprofen. Like other opioid medications, oxycodone misuse can lead to physical dependence and addiction due to its euphoric and relaxation-inducing effects. All oxycodone-containing products are Schedule II controlled substances.

Oxycodone Street Names

Oxycodone slang names can include:

  • 30s
  • 40s
  • Beans
  • Blues
  • Buttons
  • Greens
  • OC
  • Oxy
  • Whites

OxyContin

OxyContin is a brand name of oxycodone, a prescription opioid medication that treats moderate to severe pain. It can be prescribed in immediate-release 5mg OxyIR capsules, and in 10, 20, 40 and 80mg extended-release tablets depending on the pain management care required. Feelings of euphoria and relaxation can be experienced when someone takes OxyContin, which could lead to misuse and eventually dependence. Like other opioids in its class, OxyContin is a Schedule II controlled substance.

OxyContin Street Names

There are a handful of common OxyContin slang names, including:

  • Hillbilly Heroin
  • Kicker
  • OC
  • Ox
  • Roxy
  • Oxy

PCP

Phencyclidine, known as PCP, is a hallucinogenic dissociative anesthetic that was developed as an IV anesthetic in the 1950s before being discontinued due to dangerous side effects. Today, it is sold illicitly as a white powder or liquid, and it is swallowed, injected or snorted to achieve its desired effects. People who use PCP may report feeling disconnected from reality in addition to euphoria. However, unwanted effects such as aggression, violence, kidney failure and seizures may also occur. Phencyclidine is a Schedule II controlled substance.

PCP Street Names

Street names for phencyclidine include:

  • Angel dust
  • Embalming fluid
  • Hog
  • Killer weed
  • Love boat
  • Ozone
  • Peace pill
  • Rocket fuel
  • Super grass
  • Wack

Percocet

Percocet is a combination prescription opioid medication that combines oxycodone and acetaminophen to treat moderate to severe pain. Like other opioids, Percocet’s pain-relieving and euphoric effects may lead to dependence and addiction, but due to the risk of liver damage, the addition of acetaminophen to oxycodone makes Percocet less likely to be misused. All products containing oxycodone, including Percocet, are Schedule II controlled substances.

Percocet Street Names

Common Percocet street names include the following:

  • Hillbilly Heroin
  • Kicker
  • OC
  • Ox
  • Roxy
  • Perc
  • Oxy

Peyote

Peyote is a small cactus that contains mescaline, a hallucinogen. The top or crown of the cactus consists of small discs that are cut off before being prepared for ingestion. They can be chewed as-is, soaked in water to create a potent liquid, or ground into a powder that can be smoked or packed into capsules. People consume peyote and mescaline to achieve hallucinations and altered perceptions of space and time, but nausea, vomiting and muscle weakness may occur, among many other adverse effects. Peyote and mescaline are Schedule I controlled substances.

Peyote Street Names

Street names for both peyote and mescaline include:

  • Buttons
  • Cactus
  • Mesc
  • Peyoto

Psilocybin

Psilocybin is a hallucinogenic chemical derived from certain fresh and dried mushrooms found in the U.S., Central America and Mexico. Psilocybin is ingested orally in mushroom form, which can be eaten plain, mixed with food or prepared as a tea. Psilocybin’s psychological effects include an inability to separate fantasy from reality, hallucinations and panic or psychotic episodes. Physical effects may include a lack of coordination, nausea and vomiting, and muscle weakness. Psilocybin is a Schedule I controlled substance.

Psilocybin Street Names

Rather than street names for the chemical psilocybin, street names for mushrooms are often used:

  • Magic Mushrooms
  • Mushrooms
  • Shrooms

Ritalin

Ritalin (methylphenidate) is a prescription stimulant that can control ADHD symptoms, including controlling actions and difficulty keeping focus in children and adults. Ritalin is available in several forms, including a liquid solution, extended-release tablets and chewable tablets, and a long-acting dissolving oral tablet. Unlike Desoxyn, Ritalin is not an amphetamine and its effects tend to be milder. However, Ritalin is also a Schedule II controlled substance, meaning it comes with a risk of dependence and addiction.

Ritalin Street Names

Some street names for Ritalin include:

  • Kibbles and Bits

Roxicet

Roxicet is a combination prescription opioid medication that combines oxycodone with acetaminophen. It is prescribed to treat moderate to severe pain. Roxicet’s relaxing, euphoric effects may lead to dependence and addiction like other opioids, but the addition of acetaminophen to oxycodone makes Roxicet less likely to be misused due to the heightened risk of severe liver damage. All oxycodone products, including Roxicet, are Schedule II controlled substances.

Roxicet Street Names

Roxicet’s street names may fall under the umbrella of oxycodone’s street names, and can include:

  • 30s
  • 40s
  • Beans
  • Blues
  • Buttons
  • Greens
  • OC
  • Oxy
  • Whites

Suboxone

Suboxone is a brand name of buprenorphine, an opioid partial agonist-antagonist that treats opioid dependence. Specifically, Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, where naloxone has been added to block the euphoric high of buprenorphine for people in recovery who do not have a buprenorphine use disorder. Despite the addition of naloxone, Suboxone and all substances containing buprenorphine are Schedule III controlled substances, meaning they are opioids with potential for abuse and addiction despite medical uses.

Suboxone Street Names

Suboxone’s street names may fall under the buprenorphine street name umbrella. These can include:

  • Big Whites
  • Buse
  • Oranges
  • Small Whites
  • Sobos
  • Stops
  • Strips
  • Sub
  • Subs

Synthetic Marijuana

Synthetic marijuana, sometimes called K2 or spice, is created in laboratories to mimic THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. It’s usually labeled “not for human consumption” and sold as other items, including potpourri and herbal incense in an attempt to avoid controlled substance classification and further prosecution. Before smoking synthetic marijuana, it is typically sprayed on or mixed with plant material. Liquids can also be vaporized in electronic cigarettes. Its effects are similar to those of marijuana, but, unlike marijuana, multiple overdoses on synthetic cannabinoids have been reported.

Synthetic Marijuana Street Names

Synthetic marijuana street names are different from standard marijuana street names, and include:

  • Spice
  • K2
  • Blaze
  • RedX Dawn
  • Paradise
  • Demon
  • Black Magic
  • Spike
  • Mr. Nice Guy
  • Ninja
  • Zohai
  • Dream
  • Genie
  • Sence
  • Smoke
  • Skunk
  • Serenity
  • Yucatan
  • Fire
  • Crazy Clown

Tramadol

Tramadol, commonly available with the brand names ConZip and Ultram, is a prescription opioid used to treat moderate to moderately severe pain. Tramadol is available in a few formulations, including liquid, and extended release tablets and capsules. While heroin is a Schedule I controlled substance and OxyContin Schedule II, tramadol is Schedule IV, making it relatively safer in terms of misuse and dependence. However, due to its effects, there is still a low risk of abuse and addiction.

Tramadol Street Names

Tramadol and the brand name Ultram may be recognized by the following street names:

  • Chill Pills
  • Trammies
  • Ultras

Valium

Valium, the brand name for diazepam, is a longer-acting prescription benzodiazepine that can treat anxiety and alcohol withdrawal-related agitation by calming overactivity in the brain. It may also be prescribed with other medications to treat certain neurological disorder symptoms. On its own, Valium is available in several forms, including a solution, liquid concentrate and tablet. Because benzos slow the central nervous system, they cause a relaxed mood and sleepiness, which may lead someone to misuse this drug. Valium is a Schedule IV controlled substance.

Valium Street Names

There are a handful of street names for Valium, including:

  • Eggs
  • Jellies
  • Moggies
  • Vallies

Vicodin

Vicodin is a brand name of hydrocodone, an extended-release opioid that treats moderate to severe pain in combination with acetaminophen. Vicodin can be used or misused similarly to other prescription and illicit opioids, meaning a substance use disorder can develop with continued use. People who intentionally misuse Vicodin may use larger doses than prescribed, or they may purchase it illicitly, to experience the opioid’s sedative effects. In 2014, the DEA reclassified all hydrocodone combination products, including Vicodin, from Schedule III to Schedule II.

Vicodin Street Names

Street names for Vicodin may be the same as hydrocodone, and include:

  • 357s
  • Bananas
  • Dro
  • Fluff
  • Hydro
  • Tabs
  • Norco
  • Vics
  • Vikes
  • Watsons

Xanax

Similar to Valium, Xanax (alprazolam) is a prescription benzodiazepine that treats anxiety. It is sometimes used to treat depression, certain phobias and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It’s available as an extended-release tablet, concentrated liquid, and orally-dissolving tablet. Much like other benzos, misuse is usually associated with teens and young adults who take the drug by mouth or by snorting crushed pills. Tolerance, dependence and addiction are all possible when using Xanax, and this drug is therefore a Schedule IV controlled substance.

Xanax Street Names

There are many street names for Xanax, and they include:

  • Bars
  • Bicycle Handle Bars
  • Footballs
  • Hulk
  • Ladders
  • Planks
  • School Bus
  • Sticks
  • Xanies
  • Zanbars

Drug Addiction Treatment

If you or someone you love is living with a substance use disorder, it’s never too late to get help. The Recovery Village has many locations, including several in South Florida. We are proud to provide a continuum of care — from detox to aftercare — in order to provide the best chance at long-term recovery.

At The Recovery Village Palm Beach at Baptist Health Drug and Alcohol Rehab, your treatment begins with detox, allowing your body to cleanse itself in a medically supervised environment and prepare you for the rest of treatment. Then, patients advance to other levels of care, including inpatient and outpatient rehab before transitioning to aftercare with a promising road toward recovery. Your level of care will be determined by your unique situation — we suit our care for you, not just the condition.

The Recovery Village at Baptist Health is accredited by The Joint Commission and licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families, and our skilled, compassionate staff are proud to provide the care that that accreditation signifies.

We also offer different amenities at our facilities, including:

  • Outdoor swimming pool
  • Fully equipped gym
  • Multiple lounges with televisions
  • Basketball courts
  • Sand volleyball

Help is in your hands, and it’s one phone call away. At The Recovery Village Palm Beach at Baptist Health Drug and Alcohol Rehab, your recovery is our mission. Give us a call today

  • Sources

    Woelfel, M. “Pot? Weed? Marijuana? What Should We Call It?” NPR, September 19, 2019. Accessed March 9, 2022.

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